• Types of Refractive Surgery

    There are several types of refractive surgery available to correct vision problems caused by refractive errors, including: LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) Custom or bladeless LASIK Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) Epi-LASIK Conductive Keratoplasty

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  • Hyperopia

    People with hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, can usually see objects in the distance, but their close vision is blurry. Symptoms of untreated hyperopia include: Difficulty concentrating on near work, such as reading Eye strain Headaches after reading or other activities involving close focus Aching,

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  • Medicated Eye Drops

    Treatment for glaucoma often begins with medicated eye drops. The goal of these medications is to lower the pressure in the eye (intraocular pressure) and prevent damage to the optic nerve. To gain the most benefits of these medications, use them exactly as prescribed by your eye doctor. Sometimes your

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  • PRK (ASA)

    When the cornea is misshapen, light bends (refracts) incorrectly, leading to vision problems. Refractive surgeries aim to reshape the cornea, thereby improving vision. LASIK is one of the most popular types of refractive surgeries. However, not everyone is an appropriate candidate for LASIK. Fortunately,

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  • Laser Surgery to Treat Presbyopia (Monovision)

    Presbyopia is the gradual decline in close vision that occurs with age. The condition occurs as the lens in the eye stiffens and loses its flexibility, thereby impairing its ability to focus at images or objects up close. While multifocal prescription glasses, such as bifocals, are one possible treatment

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  • LASIK

    Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis, or LASIK, is the most common type of refractive surgery. If the curvature of your cornea deviates from the ideal curvature, light entering your eye will bend (refract) incorrectly. This is known as a refractive error and can cause vision problems. For many patients,

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  • Collagen Crosslinking

    Collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a relatively new procedure used to treat patients with keratoconus. Keratoconus is a thinning of the corneas which causes them to form a cone shape and bulge outwards. Many countries outside the U.S. use CXL, but the procedure hasn’t yet received FDA approval. However,

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  • Intacs

    Intacs Intacs, or intracorneal ring segments (ICRS), is a non-laser treatment for mild nearsightedness. It can also be used to treat the astigmatism and nearsightedness that occurs with keratoconus, one type of corneal disorder. How Intacs Works Intacs is a pair of crescent-shaped plastic devices

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  • Corneal Transplantation

    Corneal transplantation is a surgical procedure to replace part of a damaged or diseased cornea with corneal tissue from a donor. The cornea is the transparent, dome-shaped surface on the front of the eye. It plays a large part in vision by helping to focus light onto the retina. Reasons for Corneal

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  • What is Glaucoma

    Glaucoma is a condition characterized by excessive pressure in the eye, or intraocular pressure. This irregularly high pressure is due to a buildup of fluid in the eye. As intraocular pressure increases, it can compress the eye’s optic nerve, eventually leading to vision loss. Around 3 million people

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  • iStent

    The iStent Trabecular Micro-Bypass is a surgical device that is available for use in treating patients with mild-to-moderate open-angle glaucoma. Glaucoma is characterized by an excessive accumulation of fluid inside the eye, which leads to an increase in the inner eye pressure (intraocular pressure).

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  • Keratoconus

    While keratoconus can happen at any stage of life, young people between the ages of 10 and 25 are most likely to develop this disorder. For individuals with keratoconus, their cornea, the clear layer in the front of your eye, gradually thins and begins to bulge outward. Keratoconus typically causes nearsightedness

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  • Pterygium

    Pterygium is characterized by a pink tissue growth on the sclera (the white part of the eye), which seems to be the result of chronic exposure to ultraviolet light. In fact, because many surfers suffer from pterygium, the condition is often called surfer’s eye. Pterygium is not cancerous and may continue

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  • Intraocular Lenses

    If your vision is blurred due to cataracts and you are pursuing surgical intervention to correct the problem, you are likely considering which intraocular lens (IOL) to choose, to restore your vision after cataract surgery. There are a variety of IOL options to choose from. Your ophthalmologist can help

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  • Strabismus Causes and Treatment

    In order for your eyes to focus normally, six muscles around each eye must work together. When your two eyes see different images, your brain tends to favor the stronger eye. This means the weak eye gets weaker, resulting in amblyopia, or “lazy eye.” Risk factors for developing strabismus may include

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  • Post-Concussive Vision Syndrome

    More than 300,000 sports-related concussions occur each year, according to research. Many more concussions result from motor vehicle accidents, falls, and other non-sports related incidents. In addition to causing cognitive difficulties, concussions may result in a cluster of problems called post-concussive

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Locations

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Office Hours

Our Regular Hours

Monroe

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Canton

Monday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

We are open the 2nd and 4th Saturday from 8a to 12p

Sunday:

Closed